Single/Double Hung Windows

Single Hung windows are windows that have a single sash that moves vertically and is counterbalanced by a balancing system. They have a second sash that does not move called a deadlite. 

Double Hung windows are like single hung windows, but both sashes move and each have their own set of balancers

This page will inform you about how this window operates, what can go wrong with them, and recommended maintenance to keep everything working smoothly. 

Parts of Single/Double Hung Windows

  • Glass
    Typically 2 panes on modern Insulated Glass Units (IGUs)

  • Spacer Band
    An aluminum or steel frame filled with desiccant and sized to the perimeter of the glass. It is 'sandwiched' between the two panes of glass, then vacuum sealed with rubber butyl to make the IGU airtight. 

  • Grid
    Optional plastic decor between the panes of an IGU

  • Glazing Bead/Gasket
    A vinyl, wood or metal strip that holds the window pane inside the sash. Mechanical corner windows use a rubber gasket instead of beads and sealant.

  • Sash
    A vinyl, wood or metal frame that holds the glass

  • Pivot Pins
    A weight-bearing metal pin that connects the sash to the shoe and turns like a key

  • Shoes
    A plastic and metal block that connects the pivot pin to the balancer. It slides in a track on either side of the sash and locks holds the tension when tilting out the sash.

  • Balancers
    A tension spring housed in the tracks above the shoes on both sides that connects the shoe to the frame. It holds the weight of the sash up.

  • Tilt Latches
    A latch on the top of the sash that allows the sash to tilt in when released. 

  • Lock & Keeper
    Locks the bottom sash to the upper sash or deadlite.

  • Weatherstripping
    A fuzzy or rubbery strip along the edges between the sash and window frame that creates a better seal when the window is closed.

  • Screen
    Mesh stretched to a frame the perimeter of the window's opening.

  • Frame
    The vinyl, wood or metal housing of all the aforementioned parts that fills the opening in the wall.

  • Glass
    Typically 2 panes on modern Insulated Glass Units (IGUs)

  • Spacer Band
    An aluminum or steel frame filled with desiccant and sized to the perimeter of the glass. It is 'sandwiched' between the two panes of glass, then vacuum sealed with rubber butyl to make the IGU airtight. 

  • Grid
    Optional plastic decor between the panes of an IGU

  • Glazing Bead/Gasket
    A vinyl, wood or metal strip that holds the window pane inside the sash. Mechanical corner windows use a rubber gasket instead of beads and sealant.

  • Sash
    A vinyl, wood or metal frame that holds the glass

  • Pivot Pins
    A weight-bearing metal pin that connects the sash to the shoe and turns like a key

  • Shoes
    A plastic and metal block that connects the pivot pin to the balancer. It slides in a track on either side of the sash and locks holds the tension when tilting out the sash.

  • Balancers
    A tension spring housed in the tracks above the shoes on both sides that connects the shoe to the frame. It holds the weight of the sash up.

  • Tilt Latches
    A latch on the top of the sash that allows the sash to tilt in when released. 

  • Lock & Keeper
    Locks the bottom sash to the upper sash or deadlite.

  • Weatherstripping
    A fuzzy or rubbery strip along the edges between the sash and window frame that creates a better seal when the window is closed.

  • Screen
    Mesh stretched to a frame the perimeter of the window's opening.

  • Frame
    The vinyl, wood or metal housing of all the aforementioned parts that fills the opening in the wall.

What can go wrong with them?

Typically, balancers go bad because of a lack of maintenance. Balancers and their related parts need to be lubricated periodically (every 6 - 12 months depending on environment) and the channels need to be cleaned of any debris. A Window Wellness Service © can lengthen the life of any functional balancer. 

 

Neglected balancers will rust and slowly require more force to operate. More force puts more stress on the balancer and the vicious cycle degrades the part. When they break (or the shoe breaks), there is no counterbalance to hold your window up.

Types of Balancers

Spiral Balancers​/Turbo Lifts

Spiral balancers are often found in tilting vinyl windows and consist of a spirally wound helical spring. The top attaches to the window frame with a screw. The bottom has a spiral rod that twists out of the nylon bearing. The end of that spiral has a set of nubs that set into the upper shoe. The shoe connects the balancer to the sash via the pivot pin attached to the sash.

Recommended Maintenance

Typically, balancers go bad because of a lack of maintenance. Balancers and their related parts need to be lubricated periodically (every 6 - 12 months depending on environment) and the channels need to be cleaned of any debris. A Window Wellness Service © can lengthen the life of any functional balancer. 

 

Neglected balancers will rust and slowly require more force to operate. More force puts more stress on the balancer and the vicious cycle degrades the part. When they break (or the shoe breaks), there is no counterbalance to hold your window up.

LDS Renovations Inc.

Window Repair and Maintenance Service

Fixawindow.com

Grayslake, IL, 60030 United States

Ronnie Barnes © 2020

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773-580-8255